2019-2020 Course Catalog 
  
    Jul 12, 2020  
2019-2020 Course Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Nutrition (Master’s Level)

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Qigong

Qigong literally means “energy work” or “energy cultivation.” Personal experience of, awareness of, and sensitivity to qi are considered imperative to the successful practice of classical Chinese medicine. In a series of nine weekend retreats and sets of weekly practice sessions, students are immersed in the fundamentals of the Jinjing (Tendon and Channel) School of Qigong, one of China’s true alchemical life science traditions. By way of traditional lineage instruction, students experience the elements of a deeply nourishing qigong practice and learn to apply their skills and knowledge to the education and treatment of others. In particular, students learn to prescribe individualized qigong treatment plans for patients.

The teaching series is designed for CCM students admitted into the Qigong Certificate program.

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Shiatsu

The shiatsu series presents a thorough grounding in the principles and style of Asian bodywork, the energetic anatomy upon which it is based, and the fundamentals of touching with quality. Students learn a variety of techniques and maneuvers in the context of a complete, full-body massage. This style of shiatsu is highly effective and enjoyable to give as well as receive. Though shiatsu is a Japanese word and massage tradition, it derives from Chinese sources and is based on the same theories and principles that have influenced the entire pan-Asian approach to medicine. These courses present shiatsu as a holistic massage focusing on wellness, and do not require the ability to diagnose in order to be effective. Shiatsu is a complete modality on its own, but also trains the student in the art of palpation and general sensitivity, which is useful in all aspects of a medical practice.

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Taiji

Taiji Quan (T’ai Chi Ch’uan) literally means “the very pinnacle, highest, or greatest fist,” i.e., martial art. A more useful translation might be “the ultimate exercise.” From a Chinese medical perspective, taiji harmonizes the “three treasures,” jing, qi and shen (essence, energy and spirit). Its precisely choreographed movements create a relaxing mind-body dance that stretches and strengthens the entire body; its slow, deliberate moves develop balance and grace; its meditative style facilitates harmonious breathing and a focused mind. There are many variations within the world of taiji; a modified Yang style form is the one taught at NUNM. Over three quarters, students learn the sequence of moves along with the principles of movement that accompany them, and an inward-looking focus that emphasizes the cultivation and awareness of qi. The taiji courses are open to all NUNM students.

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Undergrad - Integrative Medicine

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Undergrad - Massage Therapy

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Undergrad - Natural Sciences

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